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Olympus Camera OM-D E-M1

Retail price: €1399.00



21.34
Innekewilnu

Auto-Bidding: help

Olympus  Camera OM-D E-M1
Retail price:
€ 1399.00
Countdown:
15 seconden
Status:
Verkocht
Auction start:
2019-05-15 18:00:00
End of auction not later than:
2019-08-15 18:00:00
Shipping costs:
€ 8.50
Bids:

22:22:54u Innekewilnu21.34
22:22:40u Vrijdagke21.33
22:22:34u Innekewilnu21.32
22:22:27u Vrijdagke21.31
22:22:17u Innekewilnu21.30
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22:21:48u Chreet21.26
22:21:43u Goal21.25

Ten years ago the Olympus E-1 and Four Thirds system was launched, with the last Four Thirds camera released three years ago, the Olympus E-5.

During the design study of the next professional grade camera to replace the Olympus E-5, it was decided that the Micro Four Thirds system was the best way to go, with the benefits of a smaller size, as well as the ability to use both Micro Four Thirds, and Four Thirds lenses.

Olympus were also performing a design study on the Olympus E-7 digital SLR, however, by using an electronic viewfinder (EVF) in the new Olympus OM-D E-M1, they are able to provide a much larger view, compared to an optical viewfinder - the optical prism would need to be significantly larger to match the EVF.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Features

With compatibility with Micro Four Thirds, the Olympus OM-D E-M1 has access to 16 Olympus Micro Four Thirds lenses, and 26 lenses from other manufacturers. There is also access to 23 Four Thirds lenses using the MMF-3 adapter, which provides auto focus for the lenses, bringing the total number of lenses available to 65.

The camera is designed to have a comfortable handgrip that will suit the use of both Micro Four Thirds and Four Thirds lenses, and the new OM-D E-M1 is designed to merge the best of Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds, with Olympus officially saying there will not be another Four Thirds Digital SLR. The Olympus OM-D E-M5 will remain on the market.

Key features

  • 16 megapixel Live MOS sensor - new
  • Phase detection AF on sensor
  • Dual Fast AF: Phase Detection / Contrast Detection Focus
  • 2.36million dot LCD EVF with 0.74x magnification
  • No AA / Optical Low Pass Filter on the sensor
  • New TruPic VII image processor
  • ISO100 (Low) to ISO25600
  • 1/8000s shutter speed
  • Full HD video with stereo sound, Mic socket
  • 5-axis in body image stabilisation
  • 10fps continuous shooting (upto 41 RAW shots)
  • 6.5fps continuous AF (upto 50 RAW shots)
  • Wi-Fi and remote operation
  • Dust / Splash / Freeze proof (to -10C)

The new TruPic VII image processor combined with the new sensor is designed to give better noise at ISO25600, compared to the E-M5, and as well as better noise performance it does not lose as much colour saturation. The new image processor also provides chromatic aberration correction (a first for Olympus Micro / Four Thirds cameras), sharpness optimisation based on lens attached (when using Olympus 43 or M43 lenses), this also works to correct for diffraction due to a small aperture, and it also provides low-pass filter-less moiré removal.

New Art Filters including a vertical diorama mode, as well as a portrait diorama mode for smooth out of focus areas. Photo story has been improved to include a new speed frame mode, where you simply swipe your finger across the screen to follow the action of your subject.

In camera HDR processing has also been added, with the camera showing a preview of HDR before taking the photo, as well as giving the option of natural or artistic HDR styles.

The weather sealed magnesium body is dust, splash and freeze proof up to -10C. Olympus also says that all Olympus lenses are freeze proof.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Handling

The camera is designed to have a comfortable handgrip that will suit the use of both Micro Four Thirds and Four Thirds lenses, and the new OM-D E-M1 is designed to merge the best of Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds, with Olympus officially saying there will not be another Four Thirds Digital SLR. The Olympus OM-D E-M5 will remain on the market.

Key features

  • 16 megapixel Live MOS sensor - new
  • Phase detection AF on sensor
  • Dual Fast AF: Phase Detection / Contrast Detection Focus
  • 2.36million dot LCD EVF with 0.74x magnification
  • No AA / Optical Low Pass Filter on the sensor
  • New TruPic VII image processor
  • ISO100 (Low) to ISO25600
  • 1/8000s shutter speed
  • Full HD video with stereo sound, Mic socket
  • 5-axis in body image stabilisation
  • 10fps continuous shooting (upto 41 RAW shots)
  • 6.5fps continuous AF (upto 50 RAW shots)
  • Wi-Fi and remote operation
  • Dust / Splash / Freeze proof (to -10C)

The new TruPic VII image processor combined with the new sensor is designed to give better noise at ISO25600, compared to the E-M5, and as well as better noise performance it does not lose as much colour saturation. The new image processor also provides chromatic aberration correction (a first for Olympus Micro / Four Thirds cameras), sharpness optimisation based on lens attached (when using Olympus 43 or M43 lenses), this also works to correct for diffraction due to a small aperture, and it also provides low-pass filter-less moiré removal.

Improved remote operation - the new E-M1 comes with an updated remote shooting app, giving access to P/A/S/M shooting modes, shutter / aperture settings, as well as WB, exposure compensation, and ISO settings. The new remote control app also supports the Olympus Live Bulb / Live Time feature so you can see the photo exposure on the smartphone.

Interval shooting has been improved with the camera now allowing up to 999 shots to be taken, and the camera will automatically create a 100 second video inside the camera.

The EVF uses the same LCD at the VF-4, but has been improved to give a more natural feeling view, with adaptive brightness technology that automatically adjusts the brightness level depending on the lighting conditions. EVF preview options include: Aspect control, Magnified view, Tone (Highlight / Shadow Tone control), and Colour Creator, and to switch between these you simply hold the Fn2 button and scroll the rear control dial.

Colour creator is a new feature that easily lets you alter the hue and colour saturation using the front and rear dials. It can be adjusted in real time in the viewfinder with the front and rear control dials, and you can save up to 4 settings for your own photo styles.
Focus: Phase detection is used for Four Thirds lenses and covers a smaller area of the sensor, as can be seen above, with the faint lines visible on the sensor. Contrast Detection is used for Micro Four Thirds lenses, and covers nearly the entirety of the frame, with the Micro Four Thirds lenses optimised to work well with contrast detection focus. Phase detection AF uses spaced out pixels to avoid image quality degradation. Focus peaking is available, although unfortunately this is not available in video mode.

The camera is not designed to be the smallest, with other Micro Four Thirds cameras providing that solution, however the Olympus OM-D E-M1 is designed to be the right size and weight for photographers. With the MMF-3 adapter, you are able to use AF with Olympus Zuiko lenses such as the 14-35mm f/2.0 and 35-100mm f/2.0 lenses, unique in the DSLR market, although if recording video, this will be manual focus only.

The Olympus menus have not been noticeably updated or redesigned, however they do provide a massive amount of options and settings, which we go through in the video below. You can also customise the function buttons, or use the super control panel to get quicker access to your most used settings.

A video of the Olympus OM-D E-M1 shooting at 10fps can be found on the ePHOTOzine YouTube channel.

The 5-axis image stabilisation system is entirely mechanical, rather than electronic on some competitors, and has been improved when using a slow shutter speed. Using the new CIPA test standards, the system is said to give 4-stops IS performance, although under Olympus testing it gives 5-stops, as does the E-M5.

Focusing points / selection mode:
81-area multiple AF (Contrast detection AF)

 

37-area multiple AF (Phase-difference detection AF)

Continuous AF with Micro Four Thirds lenses uses both contrast and phase detection AF for improved speed. The OM-D E-M1 is said to use the same shutter unit as the Olympus PEN E-P5 but with an improved housing for a quiet shutter sound.

The OM-D E-M1 features a locking mode dial, which has a central button that you press once to release, and another press

will lock the mode dial, this means you don't have to press and hold the button to turn the mode dial like you do on other cameras. It also takes the dual-dial 2x2 control system from the E-P5, so that you can quickly and easily change what the front and rear dials do.

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 feels extremely well built, with the new rubberised handgrip giving a good area to hold on to and a large area of rubber on the rear. The rear also features an updated button design compared to the E-M5, with larger buttons, as well as a better layout making them easier to use. There are also two buttons at the front of the camera next to the lens giving the camera the same or similar level of control as professional Digital SLRs. The top left of the camera is where you will find the on/off switch, as well as drive and focus buttons.

The E-M1 uses the same battery as the OM-D E-M5 and PEN E-P5, and weighs 442g body only, or 496g with battery and memory card.

Speed - We took a number of shots to test the camera's responsiveness, from switch on to first photo, shot to shot, focusing speed etc. We take a number of shots and then use the average to ensure accurate and consistent tests, making it easy to compare with other cameras.

Shutter Response <0.05s
Wide - Focus / Shutter Response 0.15s
Full zoom - Focus / Shutter Response 0.15s
Switch on Time to Taking a Photo 1.4s
Shot to Shot without Flash 0.5s
Shot to Shot with Flash 1.7s
Continuous Shooting - JPEG
(shots before slow down)
10fps (52 shots)
Continuous Shooting - Flash 1.7s
Continuous Shooting - RAW 10fps (42 shots)